Home > R/C Technique > Learning to torque roll an RC airplane

Learning to torque roll an RC airplane

Hi! We’re back to the technique lessons! This time i’ll focus on the amazing torque rolls and how you can achieve it with success.

Torque Roll

Torque Roll

You’ve seen those super low hovers and torque rolls in demonstrations and in model magazines, and you’ve probably wondered just how they are done. Super human flying ability? Hi-tech gyro gismos and big, expensive models? Certainly, you say, torque rolls can’t be in the flight plan of a sport modeler who likes to fly normal sport models can they? Well, actually, they can.

It takes practice…

It’ll take practice, of course, and plenty of it. But saying, “just practice” is like saying if you want to paint like Picasso, just start painting. The major stumbling block for most pilots is knowing just what it is you’re supposed to be practicing. And then there’s the plane. What kind of model do you need? Maybe you’re a sport modeler and don’t want an expensive “TOC” model…if that’s what it takes.

Relax. Because besides lots of practice and a good plane, learning to Torque Roll takes one more thing: a plan. And we’ve got it right here.  So read on and we’ll let you in on how the pros got to be pros at it. It’s still going to take practice, but here’s what to practice first and what to practice with.

The Right Plane

No, it doesn’t take an expensive “TOC” model. It doesn’t even take a scale aerobatic plane. It does take a plane with some specific qualities though, but you can find these qualities in some fun, economical sport models.

The plane has to have a lot of elevator and rudder authority. This is important since, while in a hover, you need to be able to maintain pitch and yaw control with the only airflow over the tail coming from the prop.

Great power to weight ratio is a big help, too. While learning, and even if you are a torque roll master, at times you will need to “get out” in a hurry. The safest direction to get out is naturally the opposite direction of our nemesis, the ground. To hang on the prop and to blast out vertically, you need great, reliable power.

The catch-22 of torque rolling is that practicing up high gives you the altitude you need to recover when you get crossed up, but it’s a lot harder to do. Learning torque rolls lower to the ground is much easier, because you can see much better and make corrections faster, but one mistake and it’s that old nemesis again…CRUNCH!! So try to practice with as much altitude as you can.

Step 1

Like learning to ski, you need to know how to fall down and get back up first. You WILL make mistakes, even when you have it mastered. So, don’t worry about how to control the torque roll yet. Concentrate on learning to catch the model and fly out of any mistake without losing altitude, regardless of the attitude the model falls into. This is the key to the torque roll.

How to do it: At a safe altitude, pull the model vertical at about 1/4 throttle and begin to hover. Use just enough throttle to pull vertical, but not enough to sustain a hover. Let the model begin to fall out- it may fall to the side, the top, bottom or any combination. Practice catching it with the correct elevator and/or rudder input, and get the throttle in it. Focus on flying out level. After you start to get the hang of it and react faster, fly out vertical.

Trickiest Part: Don’t get confused and give the wrong input. Be careful, especially when the model falls with the nose toward you. That’s why we start at a nice safe altitude.

Step 2

You’ve now crossed the biggest hurdle to learning the torque roll. You can recover, no matter which way the model falls out. You have confidence that you can save the plane every time. Now you can concentrate on two new things. First, work on reacting with the correct rudder and elevator inputs to keep the model vertical. (The good news is Step 1 has already sharpened your orientation and reaction skills.) Second, learn to “fly” the throttle stick to maintain altitude in a hover but not climb or drop.

How to do it: Now it’s time to bring it down to a lower altitude. Start at about 25 feet, low enough to see the model and still high enough to give you a little reaction time before terra firma. Again pull to vertical, only this time add a little more power so that the model hangs motionless in the air. Once you’ve got the throttle figured out, concentrate on flying the rudder and elevator to keep the model vertical. Don’t worry about ailerons, they aren’t going to do much while you’re hovering. This is simply a balancing act, like riding a unicycle. The model may hover or it may begin to torque roll to the left. Don’t worry about rolling, this happens on its own and you don’t need to make it roll. The model will begin to roll once it is very close to dead vertical. The better you can hold the model vertical, the faster it will torque roll.

Hint: Choose a calm day to practice. Wind makes torque rolls much harder. You will also need lots of control surface throw to maintain control. Use as much as you can get, similar to a “3D” set-up if possible. While you’ll need this much control at times, it also makes it much easier to over-control the model, so use some expo. I suggest about 25% on rudder and 40 to 50% on elevator. Now you’ll have the control power when you need it, but a soft feel around neutral so you won’t over-control when making little corrections.

Trickiest part: Learning to keep up with the model’s orientation as it rolls to give the correct elevator and rudder inputs. It takes time to get good. One wrong input and the model will fall out, but you know how to fly out of a mistake, so set up and try again. Also don’t over-control. Even too much of the right correction will make you fall out. Flip back to low rates as the model falls out so you don’t over control and stall the plane. Use that expo feature in your radio.

Once you’ve got the hang of it, try backing the throttle down a few clicks as you are torque rolling and slide the model down closer to the ground. And that, in a nutshell, is just about it. So now that you’ve got a plan and you know what kind of plane, all that’s left is practice, practice, practice…

You’ve seen those super low hovers and torque rolls in demonstrations and in model magazines, and you’ve probably wondered just how they are done.

Super human flying ability? Hi-tech gyro gismos and big, expensive models? Certainly, you say, Torque Rolls can’t be in the flight plan of a sport modeler who likes to fly normal sport models can they? Well, actually, they can.

It takes practice…

It’ll take practice, of course, and plenty of it. But saying, “just practice” is like saying if you want to paint like Picasso, just start painting. The major stumbling block for most pilots is knowing just what it is you’re supposed to be practicing. And then there’s the plane. What kind of model do you need? Maybe you’re a sport modeler and don’t want an expensive “TOC” model…if that’s what it takes.

Relax. Because besides lots of practice and a good plane, learning to Torque Roll takes one more thing: a plan. And we’ve got it right here.

So read on and we’ll let you in on how the pros got to be pros at it. It’s still going to take practice, but here’s what to practice first and what to practice with.

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